December 10, 2011

Please, sir....

Please, David Hayes, 2011, WordFoto

Earlier this week, my wife and I ventured north for an early Christmas visit with her sister and her husband...who live on Torch Lake, Michigan...which is near Bellaire. The visit had several agendas: one was for the Christmas visit and merriment...the other to continue to check out the area. You see, we plan to move up to Traverse City...which is about 45 minutes to the east of Torch Lake...hopefully the early part of 2013. But this is a separate story....

We arrived at their house late Monday night and had an enjoyable dinner and visit. Tuesday was spent exploring more of Traverse City and that nearby area. Come Wednesday, they took us to visit Petoskey, Michigan which sits on Lake Michigan. It was a cold, snowy, blowy afternoon when we arrived in Petoskey but the town proved to be quite delightful!! Among other things, we discovered a shoe store like no other! Not only did it have all the right styles...but also all the sizes. Unheard of around were I live! And...it was decorated with a wonderful assortment of vintage items...none of which were for sale. We spent sometime in here browsing...I didn't buy any shoes but did buy a hat and some socks...again...another story. But I digress from the main point of this posting...

Our first stop was the Crooked Tree Arts Center. This is a wonderful center that was showcasing the work of many northern Michigan artists as part of their holiday festivities. All of the work was tastefully displayed...and for sale. Now...thinking about my blog...and bringing home ideas for future pieces...I took out my iPhone and started taking snaps of some great assemblage works. It wasn't but a short moment later that I was approached by someone in the Center and asked not to take photos. I instantly apologized and put my iPhone away. (Please understand that there was no notice about photography in the exhibit area.) 

I have different thoughts about this policy. While I respect an artist's wishes not to have their work photographed, on the other hand I have no problem with the casual photography I was doing. I wouldn't mind my work photographed in this manner...feeling that a prospective buyer might want to take photos with them for future reference. So...I'm running another poll to check how you all feel about this. Do you approve of a no photo policy? Look to the right of this post...and vote!

We did end up buying two pieces...two tiles by Pat and Chip Denison of Denison Tiles. These are now hanging on our bathroom wall between our sinks. (The pics below were taken from this vantage point!)

Pat and Chip Denison
Pat and Chip Denison


8 comments:

Seth said...

One of my pet peeves. For me, an art viewing experience is less of an experience when I am not allowed to take photos. I can understand no flash and I suppose when it is a private collection...but otherwise...I am all for photography.

amyd said...

even at museums (recently being at the High Museum in Atlanta), they let you photograph - and interestingly with the featured exhibit,you could only use a camera phone (of course with no flash!) When people ask permission (and I engage them to understand why they are taking a photo) I have no problem...did they explain why no photos in your instance? if people are going to copy, they will do it without photo - the look won't be the same without the artistic spirit...

Wyn Vogel said...

I guess I have heard of art reproduction houses canvasing contemporary artists and then taking their images and reproducing them - but it is hard as if you fall in love with some work it is nice to take memories of it home - particularly insitu as sometimes it is the venue that makes the work whole!!

There is a cafe in Brisbane I would love to share with you all - French influence and distressed timbers etc - beautiful cafe bakery and there are signs everywhere saying 'no photos' so i find this sad as I think they are negating some free advertising and also some real appreciation of their work! Cheers - So I have voted against the no photo policy - even though i know it may put some of my work at risk - but isn't 'imitation the highest form of flattery??' --- not really sure myself but will follow the argument Dave!

Carole said...

I let people take photos of my paintings all the time. I always ask that they give me credit for my work if they are going to put it up on Facebook or on their blog etc. I look at it as free publicity.

Were people allowed to sketch in the gallery?

The tiles are fun!

Love your WordFoto "Please"

MrCachet said...

I have to laugh a bit, Dave. For the most part, I allow anyone who asks to photograph my work. The "No Flash" policy is really the weakest argument against photos that I can think of. Unless of course you were planning on playing with it and making it your own. Then it would be stealing. I don't think a real artist would do that.

By the way, the post title piece is most excellent. Your thumbnail caught my eye.

jen said...

So many people have camera phones or even just small digital cameras, that there is a lot of 'oh, i need to have so-and-so look at this'...as you say, for perspective buyers.
on another note: two of my aunts & uncles, my grandparents, and until recently my mother all live in petoskey!! it's where i learned to ski. it really is beautiful.

Happy Little Trees Studio said...

I guess the flash thing in museums makes sense to me, but now with camera phones in every pocket, seems wierd to have a no photo policy. People do take photos so they can copy work, but sometimes if my work inspires someone, I would want them to take a photo ref of it.

Holly Dean said...

Now you've hooked me on WordFoto! I love the tiles you collected :) I think photography should be allowed... I like to believe that people have good intentions for the most part!