February 25, 2015

On The Hunt

On the Hunt. David Hayes, 2015.

Something a little different today...a landscape vs. the still lives I've been posting as of late. I took this a couple of days ago whilst walking my Brittany along the Little Miami River here in Milford, OH. What I was after was a pano of the frozen river but my dog, always the ham, decided to photo bomb while I was running the shot. Taking a look at it later I decided to keep her in the shot...makes for a more interesting image don't you think? (Shot with my iphone6 in pano mode, processed with Stackables and Snapseed.)

February 23, 2015

Two Versions

Version 1. David Hayes, 2015

You've seen my iphoneography images from this shoot in my earlier posts...now it's time to show you what I did with my DSLR and Lightroom/Photoshop. Version 1 was edited in Lightroom and the preset Kim Klassen gave us was applied.

Version 2. David Hayes, 2015.

With Version 2, I opened the first version in Photoshop and layered on a texture Kim also gave us with this lesson. I think I like this version the best!

February 22, 2015

Four Lovelies


Pears have always been a subject of artists and photographers. Their skin and curves seem to attract many artists, including myself. Four Lovelies is my most recent study of pears this time shot with my iphone native camera app and processed with the iphoneography apps Distressed FX and a touch of Snapseed.


Let’s begin with the source image taken with my iphone 6 camera. I shot this using natural light against a white background in my kitchen. Looking at this image I immediately like how the light played along the curves of each of the four pears.


Opening the app Distressed FX, I picked the “Finch” filter in the top row which gave the image a nice late afternoon glow.


Moving to the second row of filters, I then used “Broken” as I wanted to give the image a vintage painterly look. This filters has a great texture feel to it!


Time for a bit of tweaking! Clicking on the “Adjustment” icon in the right hand corner, I then adjusted the Contrast, Brightness, and Color Palate using the slider bars. This helped pull out more of the shadows and details. I then saved this version to my camera roll and moved to Snapseed.


Here’s what I have so far.



If you’ve never used the app Snapseed, I would highly recommend that you get it for your toolbox. Not only does it have some great effects but also it is my go-to “finishing” app when I want to quickly add a bit of polish to my images.

Opening the image in Snapseed, I used the “Tune Image” feature to fine tune the image’s contrast and saturation.



I normally don’t add “Frames” to my images, but this one just seemed to need one! So…I went to the “Frame” menu and picked “Frame 10”. Perfect!


The finished image, Four Lovelies. In five quick steps…can’t beat that!!


February 21, 2015

A Different Approach

Oranges and Such. David Hayes, 2015

The beat goes on with my Be Still 52 workshop! This week we were asked to do prop gathering and then play around with more side lighting. Gathering props was fun...I do like finding something new to play with. I even took some time to build an elaborate set up to shoot against! Side lighting was supplied by one photo lamp instead natural light as I've done in the past.

From the onset I had planned to shoot my set-ups with both my iPhone 6 and Nikon DSLR...and I did that with this shoot. What I've decided to do differently is instead of processing my iphoneography images like I might in Lightroom/Photoshop, I would use one of the many "alternative" apps that I have. So...it was Hipstamatic for Oranges and Such and Table Top. 

Table Top. David Hayes, 2015.

For those who might want to know, the Hipsta combo I used for Oranges and Such was Salvador 84/D-Type Plate and for Table Top is was Madalena/Robusta.

February 18, 2015

Another Look

At Point. David Hayes, 2015.

Continuing on with my shoot this week, here are two of the images I shot with my DSLR and processed with Lightroom. At Point takes a closer look at the feather, quill, music sheet still life I shared on Monday. Processing in Lightroom involved touching up the contrast, exposure, temperature, and such. I then used one of Lightroom's Color Presets to give it a final "look".


Silver Pot. David Hayes, 2015.

As with At Point, this was taken with my DSLR and processed in Lightroom. This time I used one of Lightroom's Black and White presets. I like how this preset helped me bring out the tonal range and contrasts in this image. Much more dramatic than the color original!!

February 16, 2015

Feathers

Feathered. David Hayes, 2015.

Be Still 52, Lesson 5 had us taking a look at side lighting our subjects using natural light...something I've been doing anyway. So I took the time to play around with some feather sets I recently purchased...and side lighting at the same time! 

Feathered was shot using my iPhone6 and then processed using the Stackables app. This was set up on my table and I stood on a stool to be able to shot straight down. Side lighting was supplied by a nearby window.

Traditional. David Hayes, 2015.

Traditional uses the same set of feathers and sheet music but this time I added a silver pitcher, braced the sheet music against a grayish board and shot it straight on with my iPhone6. This time I processed it with the iColorama app to give it a painterly feel. Again, the lighting is from the side.

February 13, 2015

Baby's Breath

Baby's Breath (v1)., David Hayes, 2015.

Here's another look of the set-up I used in my posts this week...this time from above. Once again I was playing around with the depth of field/soft focus effects I could obtain by changing my aperture settings. In this version, shot with my DSLR and processed in Lightroom, I did no more than some adjustments for contrast, exposure, etc. Once this was in place, I used the Melancholy preset.


Baby's Breath (v2), David Hayes, 2015.

For the version, I took the first version into Photoshop and applied the Waterfront texture. Not much of a difference but I do think this version is a little "softer" in its feel.


February 11, 2015

Black Pots

Black Pot (v1). David Hayes, 2015.

Continuing on with the Lesson 4 prompt of Wabi-Sabi, I used the same set-up as I did in Monday's post but this time shot with my Nikon D90 and edited using Lightroom. One of the concepts discussed by Kim Klassen in this lesson was the use of shallow depth of fields to create a more dreamy look to you images. In this image I set my Nikon to Aperture Priority mode and focused on the pot. This gave me a nice soft focus look to the baby's breath and background. All I did in Lightroom was some exposure and contrast adjustments...and the Heal tool to remove some stray flowers that were "out-of-place".


Black Pot (v2). David Hayes, 2015.

After I had established the first version (above) as my base, I then applied the "Melancholy" preset that Kim included with this lesson. It give a very subtle feel to the image, particularly to the background. 

I'm going back and forth as to which version I like...what do you think?

February 9, 2015

Wabi-Sabi


Within. David Hayes, 2015.

Without. David Hayes, 2015.

Lesson 4 of Kim Klassen's "BeStill 52" workshop has us contemplating the concept of Wabi-Sabi - the concept of simplicity, perfect imperfection, and natural processes. These two images are my iphoneography answer to this concept. Same set-up but two different angles...and two different feels. Within was shot with my iphone6 and edited using the VSCO app. Without was also shot with my iphone6 but edited using the Stackables app.

In my Wednesday posting I'll share what I came up using my Nikon DSLR, Lightroom, and Photoshop. So make sure to come on back!



February 6, 2015

February Light

February Light. David Hayes, 2015.


Photography is all about capturing light...light can make or break a composition. With this said, I am always aware how light plays even on something as simple as a bouquet of flowers sitting on a cabinet. When I see light play I like, I try to capture it the best I can. Having my iPhone always handy makes this easy. After the shot, then it's all in the edit. I do like how this quick shot came out!


February 4, 2015

Under Glass

Under Glass. David Hayes, 2015.

Using the same set-ups and prompts that I mentioned in my last post these two images, Under Glass and Waiting where shot with Nikon D90 and edited with Lightroom. 

Whilst in Lightroom I gave all the Develop presets a try. Lots to chose from...and I hope to start building my own soon. Someday...

Waiting. David Hayes, 2015.

February 2, 2015

Rule of Threes

Rule of Threes. David Hayes, 2014

Lesson Three of the BeStill_52 workshop has us focusing on "gathering" surfaces, textures, and backdrops...needless-to-say one of my favorite activities! It was off to my local Lowes where I picked up some ceramic tiles as well as 2'x2' boards to create surfaces. I also bought some chalkboard paint and wall paper boards that I hope to use on these boards sometime this week. Oh...and a trip with my wife to her favorite fabric store for several yards of linen. 


Three Up. David Hayes, 2014.

While there were no specific photography prompts given in Lesson 3, Kim did discuss the "Rule of Threes" concept in composition as well as the use of negative space. She did offer an optional prompt: round, white, and minimal...which I used as inspiration for this series. Using some of my new found props and a set of three cups and saucers, I did a shoot using both my iPhone6 camera app and my Nikon D90. These three are from the iPhone6 shoot, each edited with a different app. I'll be working with the Nikon images soon with postproduction using Lightroom and/or Photoshop. So stay tuned!

Counterpoint. David Hayes, 2014.

Rule of Threes: iPhone6 camera app, Stackables app.
Three Up: iPhone6 camera app, Distressed Fx app.
Counterpoint: iPhone6 camera app, iColorama app.

January 28, 2015

More - Be Still

Be Still - V3. David Hayes, 2015


As I mentioned in Monday's post, I have started Kim Klassen's "Be Still 52" workshop. Our first photographic assignment involved working with negative space and the rule of 3's. I set up a simple still life using a glass vase, three antique silver knives, and a canvas cloth. 

In Monday's post I showed you what I did using my iPhone6 camera app and two different apps. I also shot this set-up using my Nikon D90 DSLR camera and then applied a Lightroom preset that Kim provided us in the lesson as well as a texture that was applied using Photoshop CC. The results of this can be seen above. 

I'm looking forward to doing all the lessons in Kim's workshop in this manner...shooting with both my iPhone6 and my Nikon followed by editing using my apps as well as Lightroom and Photoshop. Perhaps...even a bit of cross platform work as well! Could be interesting...

January 26, 2015

Be Still

BeStill 2a. David Hayes, 2015

I'm not one to have the patience or the staying power to take on-line workshops...I usually drop out mid-way from neglect or boredom. I'm hoping to change that with the workshop I have just started, "BeStill52" run by Kim Klassen. My reasoning is to sharpen my still-life photo skills and at the same time getting back to using Adobe LightRoom and Photoshop, both have sat dormant on my desktop for any number of years. So we'll see what happens!

Our first challenge didn't involve any actual photography, just some set-up activities and the like. So far so good. The second challenge has us working with a very simple set-up and exploring the use of negative space in our images using the Rule of Thirds and a 5:4 ratio. 

For the image above, "BeStill 2a", I applied these concepts shooting with my iPhone6 native camera app. I then used the app Handy Photo to remove blemishes and the app VSCO to apply a filter much like what Kim uses in Lightroom and then in Photoshop.

BeStill 2b., David Hayes, 2015.

In this version "BeStill 2b", I used the same source image and used several filters from the app Stackables to give it more of a grunge look...and something more to my style!

I also shot this set-up using my Nikon D90 DSLR but haven't had the opportunity to work with those images. My plan is to download them into Lightroom and then apply the LR preset and PS filter Kim used in her demo. Hopefully I will have that for you to see very soon.